4 Different Parenting Styles That will Make You Go Wow

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A guest post beautifully written by Nicole Emanuel

How often do you question your parenting style

When your child is running aimlessly around the grocery store knocking things over, screaming at the top of their lungs, do you stand back scrambling to ease the stares of the other moms in the aisle or let them go handing them a single glare that says, break a single thing and you’ll have their asses? 

Maybe it’s when you’re comparing your children to your best friend’s perfectly well-behaved, polite children. Asking yourself, where in the heck have I gone wrong? Why does it appear my children are so different from others? 

Whatever the reasoning you have for questioning your parenting style, trust that each mom does things differently, and your parenting journey is your own. Here we will explore the characteristics and effects of the 4 different parenting styles.  

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Whatever the reasoning you have for questioning your parenting style, trust that each mom does things differently, and your parenting journey is your own. Here we will explore the characteristics and effects of the 4 different parenting styles.  

No matter the volume of chaotic moments you experience as a mother, your parenting journey is your own. In part, we parent our children, by the way, we were raised. Either we want to instill in them the same or similar values passed down by the generations before us. Or, we’d rather acknowledge the dysfunction in our upbringing and offer our children something different, something better.

When I first became a mother, I read every book there was on parenting, or at least it felt like it. After reading nearly 100 books, I realized that there is no clear roadmap for parenting. These books were packed with research or parents who were simply sharing their perspectives and experience. And that nothing would guarantee the best outcome and success. That would make parenting far too easy. 

Just like most moms, all I wanted was to do things right. I wanted to ensure that I gave my child the best conceivable chance of succeeding and overcoming every milestone in life. But, like everyone else, I would have to figure it out along the way.

 The 4 Parenting Styles 

Through my countless hours of reading, I came across some very interesting research that outlined four different styles of parenting. This was a revelation to what I was looking for, to better understand my natural approach to raising my children and my intended results. 

Initially, I believed that no parenting style was right or wrong. Only that there are basic fundamental aspects of parenting, that help shape and develop a child into a healthy, well-behaved, successful adult. However, that was before I understood each of the four parenting styles and their effects on children. And then it became clear that there are key concepts in parenting that drive a child’s development and in turn dictate their behaviors. 

That’s where the foundation I believe to be true was born, and anything in-between that shapes our unique approach to parenting.  

So during my quest to more clearly understand parenting, I found that researchers outlined these four different styles of parenting.

· Authoritative Parenting

· Authoritarian Parenting

· Permissive Parenting

· Neglectful or Uninvolved Parenting

Baumrind’s Parenting Theory

In the 1960s, a developmental psychologist who worked out of the University of California at Berkeley named Diana Baumrind. She observed very distinct behavior differences between preschoolers. And over time, she connected the different behaviors in the children with a set of parenting styles with specific traits involved.

Her observation led to further research, eventually developing the theory that a child’s behavior is closely related to the style of parenting, which determines the child’s overall development and outcome in their lives.

Today we know this research and determination as to the Baumrind’s Parenting Styles. 

They break parenting into two separate categories or dimensions to describe the pillars of parenting: 

·      Demandingness: refers to the degree parents will go to control their children’s behaviors

·      Responsiveness: refers to the parent’s who are accepting and sensitive towards their children’s emotional and developmental needs

Baumrind’s theory first identified three of the four pillars of parenting. She observed and classified authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting. Later, other researchers, Maccoby and Martin who took her research and expanded on it one step further, in 1983. 

Together they characterized the four different styles of parenting. And over decades of additional research, they identified the average result of each parenting style. 

Now, if this doesn’t add more pressure of feeling the heat of how important parenting is, I don’t know what does. I mean, I am sure you already know how crucial it is to enforce the best style of parenting, for the long-term success of your children’s lives. 

Authoritative Parenting Style

Authoritative parenting is the parenting style classified by high responsiveness and high demands. Authoritative parents react attentively to their child’s emotional needs, while at the same time, they have high standards or expectations for their children. Authoritative parenting style involves highly defined limits and the parents typically enforce those boundaries. 

According to various studies, out of all four parenting styles, authoritative parenting provides the best results later in adulthood, and here are some documented reasons why. 

angry parent
Image: Pexels – Skitterphoto

Results of Authoritative Parenting

· Children are independent and self-reliant

· Tend to be happy and content 

· Ability to regulate emotions and exert self-control

· Develop healthy social skills

· Express warmth and compassion towards others

· Willing to explore unfamiliar things and unfamiliar environments without fear

· Are competent and assertive

· Children are more likely to achieve higher academic success

· Engage more with school activities 

· Have higher self-esteem

· Maintain a highly functional mental health 

· Less likely to suffer from substance abuse

· Less likely to show violent behaviors

· Adjust more easily to new environments

Examples of Authoritative Parenting 

As I mentioned earlier, there are no detailed instructions for parenting. Only suggestions, descriptions, and definitions combined with words of advice that guides you to fill in the gaps. 

· Parents listen to their children attentively and in an engaging tone or conversation

· They’re warm, kind, and loving (nurturing in the relationship)

· Try to be reasonable with their children instead of demanding and forceful

· Encourages their children to be self-starters to prepare and encourage independence

· Establishes clear limits and boundaries

· Consistently enforces those limits and boundaries 

· Uses positive discipline instead of degrading, forceful, punitive measures

· Earns a child’s respect and does not force it. Teaching the essence and value of earned respect in other relationships

Researchers have been studying the link between different parenting styles and their connection with the child-outcome for decades. They’ve tied authoritative parenting with a superior child outcome throughout the world. This parenting style is said to be the most favored and acceptable style of parenting, because the majority become independent, self-reliant, socially accepted, academically successful, and well-behaved adults. 

You may be interested in reading: How to Raise Grateful Kids in an Ungrateful Society

Authoritarian Parenting Style 

Authoritarian parenting is a parenting style characterized by having high demands with low responsiveness. Parents with the authoritarian style typically have very high expectations of their children and provide very little positive feedback. They often show very little nurturing, where mistakes are punished with harsh reprimands. When and if the feedback is delivered it’s done negatively. Parent’s often yell and use demeaning punishments for unacceptable behavior. 

According to Baumrind, parents using the authoritarian parenting style have very strict rules and they demand that their children obey. Mistakes are reprimanded by punishment instead of discipline, and often parents don’t explain their expectations. However, they just expect the child to behave without question or debate.

Effects of Authoritarian Parenting 

Children of authoritarian Parenting often exhibit these characteristic:

· Some children have shown more aggressive behaviors outside of the home

· They associate obedience and accomplishments (success) with love

· Some children are overly shy and may seem fearful

· Have low self-esteem

· They may suffer in social situations because of their lack of self-confidence

· They tend to conform more easily; be a follower vs. a leader

· Suffer from depression and anxiety (higher risk for mental health conditions)

· Struggle to exert self-control, because they’re not enabled to make their own choices and experience organic consequences

Intensive research, observing children who are raised in the authoritarian parenting setting, has shown that the children are often very good at following the rules. This is because of the high demand from the parent in the home. However, these studies also reflect their inability to exert self-discipline. 

Children being raised in the authoritarian setting are not encouraged to explore and act independently, whereas, in an authoritative setting, the children are. The children raised in the authoritarian home are unable to organically set limits and personal standards. This does not come naturally to them. And when the child is not at home, they may struggle because the parent is not present to monitor and dictate their behavior. 

Examples of Authoritarian Parenting 

As described above, the authoritarian parenting style is where the parent has strictly enforced the rules and expectations of their children and showing very little affection and positive reinforcements. 

· Parents set a lot of rules 

· They consistently micromanage every aspect of their children’s behaviors and lives 

· They set many unwritten rules with little to no explanation

· They often cold and unloving towards their children 

· Punishments are extremely harsh when the rules are broken 

· Parents typically offer feedback via yelling or nagging rather than offering encouragement and positive reinforcement

· They often don’t give their children options or freedom of choice, and there’s no room for negotiation

· The expectation is that the children should just know better instead of offering an explanation  

· Very little patience is delivered by the parent and the children are simply expected to know ahead of time what is expected of them in any situation

· Parents hover over their children’s behaviors to dictate that their children do not make any mistakes 

· They shame their children to better maintain proper or expected behaviors; being very critical of their children’s movements 

Permissive Parenting Style

Permissive parenting style is when the parent has low demands of their children and high responsiveness. Typically, parents tend to be extremely loving and nurturing towards their children. They also have very little limits and set no boundaries for behavior expectations. Characteristically, permissive parents appear more like a friend to their children, instead of a parent. Instead of being a guardian who hovers over their children’s movements, they tend to be relaxed, and don’t enforce rules or expectations of their children’s behavior. 

According to research, they’ve determined that children of permissive parenting styles tend to lack self-discipline, be self-involved, and demanding.

You may like to read this study published on the behavior problems associated with parenting styles. 

Results of Permissive Parenting Style

· Some children make poor decisions because the parents have little to no expectations 

· Studies have linked poor academic success to permissive parenting

· Struggle with problem-solving and decision-making skills

· Children may show aggression towards others

· Lack of the ability to balance emotions, especially when faced with a stressful situation 

· Lack of time management or control of their habits (lack in self-control) because of the absence of structure and rules set in the home (I.e. limiting or monitoring the amount of time on an electronic device, playing video games, or watching television)

· Studies have linked children in the permissive parenting setting are more prone to substance abuse 

· Children often struggle in social situations and become unruly at school due to the lack of boundaries enforced at home

Characteristics of Permissive Parenting

· Parents set very few rules and high expectations of their children

· Usually very warm and loving

· If there are rules, they’re hardly enforced and when the rules are broken there’s little to no discipline

· Some parents use bribery with gifts to get their children to behave

· Consider their children’s opinions when making major decisions

· Provide very little structure or schedule in the home, allowing the children to come and go as they please

· They don’t hold their children responsible giving them total freedom

· Rarely enforce any form of consequences for poor decisions

· As I mentioned earlier, the relationship between the permissive parent and their children resembles that of a friendship rather than a parent and child. Often this leads to the child having little respect for their parents. Studies have reflected that this type of parenting is not always the most ideal, because of the child’s lack of development of intercommunication skills and self-control. 

Neglectful or Uninvolved Parenting Style

Neglectful parenting is a parenting style characterized by the parents’ lack of involvement in their children’s needs. The neglectful parents tend to have little demands of their children and they’re often dismissive or neglectful to their children. 

Studies of neglectful parenting have shown the least favorable results of all four parenting styles. Parents usually have very little emotional investment in their children’s lives. Hence, where the uninvolved or neglectful term comes from. 

parenting styles
Image: Pexels – Pixabay

Examples of Neglectful Parenting Style

· Parents usually offer no supervision of their children 

· They have very little expectations of behaviors 

· They show no warmth, love or affection to their children

· Parents tend to be emotionally withdrawn

· The parents don’t typically attend school events, extracurricular activities, or social events

· Parents are predominantly focused on their problems or life events and don’t have time to be considerate of their children’s needs 

As you can see, a permissive parenting style has a lot of space for the child to be independent, however, it lacks in teaching or enforcing the boundaries to do so healthily or maturely. This parenting style lacks any guidance and nurturing of their children into adulthood, leaving the child to figure life’s balance out on their own.

Results of Neglectful Parenting 

All parenting styles have an impact on the child. And neglectful parenting is no different. Here are some examples of children raised in the uninvolved parenting setting.

· Children must learn to provide for themselves

· Children are often emotionally withdrawn

· Studies have linked an increased risk for adolescent delinquency

· They may feel more stress, anxiety, and fear because of the lack of family support

· Increased risk of substance abuse 

· Children usually perform poorly in every area of their lives

· They tend to be selfish individuals, highly demanding, and struggle socially

· Some children develop unhealthy attachments to objects or people later on in life

· They struggle at school because of behavior issues. This is because the school has enforced boundaries, whereas at home they do not

Concluding Thoughts

Hopefully, I made it clear earlier that I am not a mom here to judge you or your parenting style. I am totally against mom bashing in any capacity, because as a mom I don’t think it’s fair, and I am in no way better than anyone. 

This article is merely to share the benefits or results of the different parenting styles. It’s very interesting to see that the way parents are raising their children has such dramatic long-term results. And the real question here is, what do you want for your children? 

Studies have done a great job of explaining the importance of the relationship between parent and child. And parenting is one of those tasks in life that feels like it has no right or wrong answer. But, between the four different parenting styles and their outcomes, it’s been identified as one of the most important journeys any parent will take. 

Several life-changing circumstances can change the course of a person’s life, so no matter how dedicated you are to raising a certain kind of person, those life circumstances can change that. All you can do is give it your best, learn from mistakes, stay consistent, and keep going. 

I sincerely hope you found this article valuable. If it has I’d love to hear from you, drop a comment and say hi or share it with your friends and family. 

Another popular post you may enjoy is Those Who Think Stay at Home Moms Have it Easy. I know plenty of stay-at-home moms who would beg to differ; me being one of them. 

How often do you question your parenting style? 

When your child is running aimlessly around the grocery store knocking things over, screaming at the top of their lungs, do you stand back scrambling to ease the stares of the other moms in the aisle or let them go handing them a single glare that says, break a single thing and you’ll have their asses? 

Maybe it’s when you’re comparing your children to your best friend’s perfectly well-behaved, polite children. Asking yourself, where in the heck have I gone wrong? Why does it appear my children are so different from others? 

Whatever the reasoning you have for questioning your parenting style, trust that each mom does things differently, and your parenting journey is your own. Here we will explore the characteristics and effects of the 4 different parenting styles.  

Parenting is a Journey

No matter the volume of chaotic moments you experience as a mother, your parenting journey is your own. In part, we parent our children, by the way, we were raised. Either we want to instill in them the same or similar values passed down by the generations before us. Or, we’d rather acknowledge the dysfunction in our upbringing and offer our children something different, something better.

When I first became a mother, I read every book there was on parenting, or at least it felt like it. After reading nearly 100 books, I realized that there is no clear roadmap for parenting. These books were packed with research or parents who were simply sharing their perspectives and experience. And that nothing would guarantee the best outcome and success. That would make parenting far too easy. 

Just like most moms, all I wanted was to do things right. I wanted to ensure that I gave my child the best conceivable chance of succeeding and overcoming every milestone in life. But, like everyone else, I would have to figure it out along the way.

 The 4 Parenting Styles 

Through my countless hours of reading, I came across some very interesting research that outlined four different styles of parenting. This was a revelation to what I was looking for, to better understand my natural approach to raising my children and my intended results. 

Initially, I believed that no parenting style was right or wrong. Only that there are basic fundamental aspects of parenting, that help shape and develop a child into a healthy, well-behaved, successful adult. However, that was before I understood each of the four parenting styles and their effects on children. And then it became clear that there are key concepts in parenting that drive a child’s development and in turn dictate their behaviors. 

That’s where the foundation I believe to be true was born, and anything in-between that shapes our unique approach to parenting.  

So during my quest to more clearly understand parenting, I found that researchers outlined these four different styles of parenting.

· Authoritative Parenting

· Authoritarian Parenting

· Permissive Parenting

· Neglectful or Uninvolved Parenting

Baumrind’s Parenting Theory

In the 1960s, a developmental psychologist who worked out of the University of California at Berkeley named Diana Baumrind. She observed very distinct behavior differences between preschoolers. And over time, she connected the different behaviors in the children with a set of parenting styles with specific traits involved.

Her observation led to further research, eventually developing the theory that a child’s behavior is closely related to the style of parenting, which determines the child’s overall development and outcome in their lives.

Today we know this research and determination as to the Baumrind’s Parenting Styles. 

They break parenting into two separate categories or dimensions to describe the pillars of parenting: 

·      Demandingness: refers to the degree parents will go to control their children’s behaviors

·      Responsiveness: refers to the parent’s who are accepting and sensitive towards their children’s emotional and developmental needs

Baumrind’s theory first identified three of the four pillars of parenting. She observed and classified authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting. Later, other researchers, Maccoby and Martin who took her research and expanded on it one step further, in 1983. 

Together they characterized the four different styles of parenting. And over decades of additional research, they identified the average result of each parenting style. 

Now, if this doesn’t add more pressure of feeling the heat of how important parenting is, I don’t know what does. I mean, I am sure you already know how crucial it is to enforce the best style of parenting, for the long-term success of your children’s lives. 

Authoritative Parenting Style

Authoritative parenting is the parenting style classified by high responsiveness and high demands. Authoritative parents react attentively to their child’s emotional needs, while at the same time, they have high standards or expectations for their children. Authoritative parenting style involves highly defined limits and the parents typically enforce those boundaries. 

According to various studies, out of all four parenting styles, authoritative parenting provides the best results later in adulthood, and here are some documented reasons why. 

Results of Authoritative Parenting

· Children are independent and self-reliant

· Tend to be happy and content 

· Ability to regulate emotions and exert self-control

· Develop healthy social skills

· Express warmth and compassion towards others

· Willing to explore unfamiliar things and unfamiliar environments without fear

· Are competent and assertive

· Children are more likely to achieve higher academic success

· Engage more with school activities 

· Have higher self-esteem

· Maintain a highly functional mental health 

· Less likely to suffer from substance abuse

· Less likely to show violent behaviors

· Adjust more easily to new environments

Examples of Authoritative Parenting 

As I mentioned earlier, there are no detailed instructions for parenting. Only suggestions, descriptions, and definitions combined with words of advice that guides you to fill in the gaps. 

· Parents listen to their children attentively and in an engaging tone or conversation

· They’re warm, kind, and loving (nurturing in the relationship)

· Try to be reasonable with their children instead of demanding and forceful

· Encourages their children to be self-starters to prepare and encourage independence

· Establishes clear limits and boundaries

· Consistently enforces those limits and boundaries 

· Uses positive discipline instead of degrading, forceful, punitive measures

· Earns a child’s respect and does not force it. Teaching the essence and value of earned respect in other relationships

Researchers have been studying the link between different parenting styles and their connection with the child-outcome for decades. They’ve tied authoritative parenting with a superior child outcome throughout the world. This parenting style is said to be the most favored and acceptable style of parenting, because the majority become independent, self-reliant, socially accepted, academically successful, and well-behaved adults. 

You may be interested in reading: How to Raise Grateful Kids in an Ungrateful Society

Authoritarian Parenting Style 

Authoritarian parenting is a parenting style characterized by having high demands with low responsiveness. Parents with the authoritarian style typically have very high expectations of their children and provide very little positive feedback. They often show very little nurturing, where mistakes are punished with harsh reprimands. When and if the feedback is delivered it’s done negatively. Parent’s often yell and use demeaning punishments for unacceptable behavior. 

According to Baumrind, parents using the authoritarian parenting style have very strict rules and they demand that their children obey. Mistakes are reprimanded by punishment instead of discipline, and often parents don’t explain their expectations. However, they just expect the child to behave without question or debate.

Effects of Authoritarian Parenting 

Children of authoritarian Parenting often exhibit these characteristic:

· Some children have shown more aggressive behaviors outside of the home

· They associate obedience and accomplishments (success) with love

· Some children are overly shy and may seem fearful

· Have low self-esteem

· They may suffer in social situations because of their lack of self-confidence

· They tend to conform more easily; be a follower vs. a leader

· Suffer from depression and anxiety (higher risk for mental health conditions)

· Struggle to exert self-control, because they’re not enabled to make their own choices and experience organic consequences

Intensive research, observing children who are raised in the authoritarian parenting setting, has shown that the children are often very good at following the rules. This is because of the high demand from the parent in the home. However, these studies also reflect their inability to exert self-discipline. 

Children being raised in the authoritarian setting are not encouraged to explore and act independently, whereas, in an authoritative setting, the children are. The children raised in the authoritarian home are unable to organically set limits and personal standards. This does not come naturally to them. And when the child is not at home, they may struggle because the parent is not present to monitor and dictate their behavior. 

Examples of Authoritarian Parenting 

As described above, the authoritarian parenting style is where the parent has strictly enforced the rules and expectations of their children and showing very little affection and positive reinforcements. 

· Parents set a lot of rules 

· They consistently micromanage every aspect of their children’s behaviors and lives 

· They set many unwritten rules with little to no explanation

· They often cold and unloving towards their children 

· Punishments are extremely harsh when the rules are broken 

· Parents typically offer feedback via yelling or nagging rather than offering encouragement and positive reinforcement

· They often don’t give their children options or freedom of choice, and there’s no room for negotiation

· The expectation is that the children should just know better instead of offering an explanation  

· Very little patience is delivered by the parent and the children are simply expected to know ahead of time what is expected of them in any situation

· Parents hover over their children’s behaviors to dictate that their children do not make any mistakes 

· They shame their children to better maintain proper or expected behaviors; being very critical of their children’s movements 

Permissive Parenting Style

Permissive parenting style is when the parent has low demands of their children and high responsiveness. Typically, parents tend to be extremely loving and nurturing towards their children. They also have very little limits and set no boundaries for behavior expectations. Characteristically, permissive parents appear more like a friend to their children, instead of a parent. Instead of being a guardian who hovers over their children’s movements, they tend to be relaxed, and don’t enforce rules or expectations of their children’s behavior. 

According to research, they’ve determined that children of permissive parenting styles tend to lack self-discipline, be self-involved, and demanding.

You may like to read this study published on the behavior problems associated with parenting styles. 

Results of Permissive Parenting Style

· Some children make poor decisions because the parents have little to no expectations 

· Studies have linked poor academic success to permissive parenting

· Struggle with problem-solving and decision-making skills

· Children may show aggression towards others

· Lack of the ability to balance emotions, especially when faced with a stressful situation 

· Lack of time management or control of their habits (lack in self-control) because of the absence of structure and rules set in the home (I.e. limiting or monitoring the amount of time on an electronic device, playing video games, or watching television)

· Studies have linked children in the permissive parenting setting are more prone to substance abuse 

· Children often struggle in social situations and become unruly at school due to the lack of boundaries enforced at home

Characteristics of Permissive Parenting

· Parents set very few rules and high expectations of their children

· Usually very warm and loving

· If there are rules, they’re hardly enforced and when the rules are broken there’s little to no discipline

· Some parents use bribery with gifts to get their children to behave

· Consider their children’s opinions when making major decisions

· Provide very little structure or schedule in the home, allowing the children to come and go as they please

· They don’t hold their children responsible giving them total freedom

· Rarely enforce any form of consequences for poor decisions

· As I mentioned earlier, the relationship between the permissive parent and their children resembles that of a friendship rather than a parent and child. Often this leads to the child having little respect for their parents. Studies have reflected that this type of parenting is not always the most ideal, because of the child’s lack of development of intercommunication skills and self-control. 

Neglectful or Uninvolved Parenting Style

Neglectful parenting is a parenting style characterized by the parents’ lack of involvement in their children’s needs. The neglectful parents tend to have little demands of their children and they’re often dismissive or neglectful to their children. 

Studies of neglectful parenting have shown the least favorable results of all four parenting styles. Parents usually have very little emotional investment in their children’s lives. Hence, where the uninvolved or neglectful term comes from. 

Examples of Neglectful Parenting Style

· Parents usually offer no supervision of their children 

· They have very little expectations of behaviors 

· They show no warmth, love or affection to their children

· Parents tend to be emotionally withdrawn

· The parents don’t typically attend school events, extracurricular activities, or social events

· Parents are predominantly focused on their problems or life events and don’t have time to be considerate of their children’s needs 

As you can see, a permissive parenting style has a lot of space for the child to be independent, however, it lacks in teaching or enforcing the boundaries to do so healthily or maturely. This parenting style lacks any guidance and nurturing of their children into adulthood, leaving the child to figure life’s balance out on their own.

Results of Neglectful Parenting 

All parenting styles have an impact on the child. And neglectful parenting is no different. Here are some examples of children raised in the uninvolved parenting setting.

· Children must learn to provide for themselves

· Children are often emotionally withdrawn

· Studies have linked an increased risk for adolescent delinquency

· They may feel more stress, anxiety, and fear because of the lack of family support

· Increased risk of substance abuse 

· Children usually perform poorly in every area of their lives

· They tend to be selfish individuals, highly demanding, and struggle socially

· Some children develop unhealthy attachments to objects or people later on in life

· They struggle at school because of behavior issues. This is because the school has enforced boundaries, whereas at home they do not

Concluding Thoughts

Hopefully, I made it clear earlier that I am not a mom here to judge you or your parenting style. I am totally against mom bashing in any capacity, because as a mom I don’t think it’s fair, and I am in no way better than anyone. 

This article is merely to share the benefits or results of the different parenting styles. It’s very interesting to see that the way parents are raising their children has such dramatic long-term results. And the real question here is, what do you want for your children? 

Studies have done a great job of explaining the importance of the relationship between parent and child. And parenting is one of those tasks in life that feels like it has no right or wrong answer. But, between the four different parenting styles and their outcomes, it’s been identified as one of the most important journeys any parent will take. 

Several life-changing circumstances can change the course of a person’s life, so no matter how dedicated you are to raising a certain kind of person, those life circumstances can change that. All you can do is give it your best, learn from mistakes, stay consistent, and keep going. 

I sincerely hope you found this article valuable. If it has I’d love to hear from you, drop a comment and say hi or share it with your friends and family. 

Another popular post you may enjoy is Those Who Think Stay at Home Moms Have it Easy. I know plenty of stay-at-home moms who would beg to differ; me being one of them. 

Author’s Bio

Nicole Emanuel is the creator of Keep Calm its Life, a parenting lifestyle blog. She is raising four children in the heart of Colorado, teaching others how to live their healthiest, happiest lives possible. There is no such thing as perfect parents or parenting, there’s only people using the best and most of what they have to raise up warriors who will take on the big world as Kings and Queens one day. She’s also an essential oil coach, and natural health expert. She enjoys DIY home décor in whatever spare time she has. Visit her blog for other tips and tricks to survive this thing called life.

2 Comments

  1. I really like how you describe each style and the potential outcomes both in paragraph and bullet formats. You carefully stay neutral about the four styles.
    Reading this on my mobile device it seemed like I got to your summary and suddenly started over again.

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